Killaghy Castle, County Tipperary

Situated less than 300m from Mullinahone Village, Co Tipperary, Killaghy Castle is a historic Norman castle that dates back to 1206. The St. Aulyus lived there for 8 years and then erected a stone castle to take the place of the moat and Bailey (a man-made hill of earth with a fortified wooden house on top).  The Baily was usually a raised platform of earth adjoining the mound and enclosed by a wooden stockade.

Later in the 15th and 16th century, a tower house was built. The tower house was a tall slender castle of stone, and was built primarily for defence. During Tudor times in the 16th century, a long house was added. The 18th century then saw the construction of two further buildings forming the structure of Killaghy Castle as we know it today.


Killaghy castle had numerous owners over the years. The original owners were Cromwellian planters by the name of Greene who in turn, through marriage, passed ownership to Despards and then in turn to Wright. The castle has also been owned by Watson, Fox, Naughton, Bradshaw, and Sherwood.

The castle has undergone extensive restoration over recent years, preserving the historic atmosphere with the sensitive integration of modern comforts. Stone buildings at the back of the castle date as far back as 1400 and have been tastefully restored and converted into self-catering units.

Today, the castle serves as a four-star self-catering accommodation available for holiday home hire, group bookings, parties, activity weekends and more. For more information and bookings see here:

Email: killaghycastle@gmail.com

Web: http://killaghycastle.com/

Phone: +353 (0)52 53112

Nenagh Castle – County Tipperary

The castle is the town of Nenagh’s oldest building, dating back to the 13th Century when Theobald FitzWalter, whose successors would become Earls and Dukes of Ormond, built the castle. Upon its completion c.1220 it served as the main seat of the Butler family. The castle was at one time surrounded by walls, along which were placed a gate house and two defensive towers. Though after renovations the castle is in a good state of repair, very little remains today of the gatehouse and one of the small towers.

It was at Nenagh Castle, in 1336, that a peace treaty was signed between James, the 1st Earl of Ormond, and a representative of the O’Kennedy family. The treaty included terms of peace and grants of lands for the Gaelic clan, but the agreement is more noteworthy because of what became of it over 600 years later. The treaty was presented as a gift to John F. Kennedy during his state visit to Ireland in 1963, and it is now housed in the J.F.K Library in Massachusetts. As for the O’Kennedy’s adherence to the treaty, they would go on to break its terms in spectacular fashion in 1347-8, when they unsuccessfully attacked the Castle and burnt the town. In this endeavour they were assisted by the O’Briens and O’Carrolls.

During the course of the Confederate and Cromwellian Wars the castle was seized on three separate occasions, until it was finally granted to Col. Daniel Abbot, along with extensive lands, in lieu of pay from Cromwell. The Butlers regained it after the Restoration in 1660. During the Jacobite War Anthony O’Carroll took the Castle from James, the 2nd Duke, who supported William, but it was retaken in August 1690, by Ginkel. Two years later William ordered its demolition so that it would be “rendered indefensible in ill hands”. The castle however was only partly damaged. Further destruction was wrought in 1750, when a farmer called Newsome attempted to demolish the Castle, as the sparrows it housed were destroying his barley crop nearby.

The battlements on top of the keep were rebuilt in 1861 and further conservation was undertaken in 1929. In 1985 the field around the Castle was developed as a small town park. The Office of Public works currently maintains the building. The castle is open to the public during the summer months, details below.

Opening Times Summer 2017:
Tuesday – Saturday 10.00 – 13.00 and 14.00 – 16.30
Last admission: 15.45
Admission: Free

Amazing Places in Ireland – Kilcooley Abbey, County Tipperary

Kilcooley Abbey is a Cistercian abbey situated close to the village of Gortnahoe in Tipperary, Ireland. The now derelict abbey is located within the grounds of the Kilcooley Estate, the main house of which is privately owned and occupied, though the abbey itself is open to and accessible by the public.

The abbey dates from 1182 when Donal Mor O’Brien granted lands to the Cistercians, to build an abbey here. The abbey, which is a sister house to both Jerpoint Abbey and Holy Cross Abbey, is considered to be a hidden gem, not well known, tucked away as it is in this remote corner of Co. Tipperary, inside a private walled estate.

After the Reformation, Kilcooley passed into the possession of the Earl of Ormond. It was granted to the English-born judge Sir Jerome Alexander in the 1630s and through his daughter, Elizabeth, it passed by marriage to the Barker baronets of Bocking Hall, the last of whom died in 1818.

The Cloisters of the abbey are long gone with only one column still remaining. The path of the cloisters though still remains with a pebbled walkway around the grass square.

The main part of the abbey consists of the Entrance Chamber, the Church, the Tower and the Sacristy. The Entrance Chamber has a well carved baptismal font on its south wall. The nave of the church is still roofed, but the rest of it is out in the open. The church has two large carved windows on its east and west side. The chancel contains two stone tombs and a stone altar.

One of these tombs is that of the knight Piers Fitz Oge Butler. His tomb records his death as taking place in 1526 and has some carvings of 10 apostles on the side of it carved by Rory O Tunney, who is also noted for his work in Jerpoint Abbey.

On top of the Butler tomb there is the effigy of a knight with a dog curled up at his feet.

The Sacristy is entered through a carved archway that has many carvings, such as a scene depicting the crucifixion and a mermaid holding a mirror, which was meant to depict vanity. Roger Stalley suspects this screen wall may represent the entrance to a private Butler chapel, as two Butler shields are depicted. The east end of the nave is notable, because seats for the officiating clergy have been carved into the crossing piers.

Outside the abbey there is also a beehive shaped ruin. It is not known whether this was used as a Columbarium to store ashes or a dove-cote for pigeons. But most probably it was a dove-cote since there is a 3-foot (0.91 m) wide hole in the ceiling from which they would have entered and left. Also outside the abbey is the Infirmary which is still in a fairly good condition although access to the roof of it is blocked.

Beside the Cloisters the Parlour and Chapter House are still there. Also the Calefactory (Warming room) still remains but without a roof. And on the south side of the Cloisters the Monks Dining Hall still stands. Although the dining hall has no roof, it still has a spiral staircase, but this has been barred up along with all the second floor rooms such as the Monks Dorms and the Main Tower, the Parlour, Chapter House, and Calefactory.

Much of the abbey however is open and accessible and well worth a visit.

Burnchurch Castle – County Kilkenny

Burnchurch Castle is a well-preserved 15th century Norman tower house with a round gate tower, situated 6.5 km (4.0 miles) south west of Kilkenny city, off the Clonmel Road. It is 6 km from Ballybur, near Cuffesgrange, the town of Callan, as well as Kells Priory. It is located in Burnchurch parish and was in the barony of Shillelogher.

It is said to have been built and owned by the Fitzgeralds of the house of Desmond in 15th century and continued to be occupied until 1817.

Of the original accompanying structures,  only the 12.5m high circular turret still remains, though a walled courtyard was originally attached to the castle. The castle itself is six storeys high and has an unusually large number of passages and chambers inside the walls. A great hall was formerly attached to the tower’s outside wall, but this has now vanished, as has most a bawn with a 41 foot tall tower at one corner. Old drawings of a date unknown, show remnants of buildings originally found on the site.

Many tower houses have mural chambers and passages hidden away within their walls, though few have the number and complexity of those found in Burnchurch Castle, which include numerous narrow rooms in the walls, including a “secret room” on the fourth floor. There used to be great hall attached to an outside wall of the tower, but that is now gone. There is a vault under the castle above which is the main chamber, with access to the upper three floors via an outside staircase. Notable features of the castle include mullioned windows, a fine carved fireplace and a round chimney which may have been a later addition.

It is known for being one of several Irish towers with the slightly narrower sides of the castle extending up an additional floor, creating in essence a pair of tower wide turrets.

Burnchurch Castle and tower, along with the Church of Ireland church, and the lime trees became a National Monument in 1993 and is accessible to the public.

 

Ardmayle Castle – County Tipperary

Ardmayle Castle is located in the barony of Middlethird, County Tipperary, 3 miles north of Cashel. A 13th century motte and bailey with remains of 16/17th century square towerhouse, situated opposite a medieval church still in use and also well worth a visit.

Around 1225 Richard Mór de Burgh, 1st Lord of Connaught (c. 1194 – 1242), Justicar of Ireland, aquired this land and its castle when he married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and Margaret de Braose. With this alliance he gained the cantred of Eóghanacht Caisil.

The castle later belonged to the Butlers, before it passed into the hands of the Cootes, the last proprietor having been hanged by Cromwell on the capture of the castle.

The castle has an almost hidden staircase built into the wall that leads to the roof and is perhaps best known for its secret chamber, which can be accessed via the passage leading to the castle’s latrine chute. Outside the latrine passage there is a small hole in the floor which leads to the secret chamber and staircase. It was designed so that it could be covered with a flagstone and is possibly one of the only “en suite” secret chambers in an Irish tower house.

During our visit however we found access to to the upper levels of the castle restricted, possible for safety reasons. The lower level however is open and accessible.  The castle is located on privately owned land, but can easily be viewed from the roadside.

O’Dea Castle – County Clare

O’Dea Castle, also known as Dysert O’Dea Castle, is an Irish fortified tower house, situated at Dysert O’Dea (Irish: Dísert, meaning “hermitage”), the former O’Dea clan stronghold, 5 kilometres (3 miles) from the village of Corofin, County Clare just off the R476 road. When driving to Corrofin from Ennis, look for the sign posts, then follow the track and finally the castle, which is slightly hidden, but well worth a visit.

The Battle of Dysert O’Dea, which drove the Anglo-Normans from the region for over 200 years, took place at this site on 10 May 1318. The castle was built some years later, between 1470 and 1490 by Diarmaid O’Dea, Lord of Cineal Fearmaic. The Earl of Ormond took the castle from the O’Dea clan in 1570 by force. By 1584, however, they had regained it and at that time, Domhnall Maol O’Dea was listed as owner. Domhnall supported the northern Chiefs in the Nine Years’ War of 1594-1603 and subsequently Dysert Castle fell to the Protestant Bishop of Kildare, Daniel Neylon, who in 1594 bequeathed it to his son, John. The castle however eventually returned to the O’Dea clan…

After the fall of Limerick in 1651 to the Cromwellian forces, they maintained a small garrison here, but as soon as they left, the soldiers demolished the battlements, upper floors and staircase. The Neylon family then returned but during the reign of Charles II, Conor Cron O’Dea managed to regain the castle. Conor’s sons, Michael and James, supported the cause of James II and once again lost the castle though. The lands passed to the Synge family but the castle eventually and gradually fell into ruin.

In 1970, John O’Day of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin (USA) purchased the tower and had it restored. The castle was then leased to the Dysert Development Association, which, with support from the Irish Tourist Board, opened it as “The Dysert O’Dea Castle Archaeology Centre” in 1986. It showed an exhibition of local artefacts from the stone age to 1922.

The tower won the “Clare Tourism Award” for being one of the most authentically rebuilt castles in Ireland.

It is open to the public for a small entrance fee and well worth a visit and exploration. We were able to explore the castle at our leisure and even go onto the roof, where we were treated by amazing views of the surrounding countryside.

Nearby castle:  Leamaneh castle, County Clare

 

Amazing Places in Ireland – Kilfane Church, County Kilkenny

The main feature of this lovely ruined 14th Century church is is the Cantwell Fada, an effigy of a knight built in the 1320s/30s, but during our visit we were pleasantly surprised by a real treasure-trove of interesting and well-preserved features.

Three original doorways in the north and south walls headed by ogee stones, remains of an altar, piscina, book rest and multiple recesses all grace the interior walls.

Carved from a single slab of limestone standing against the North wall, the Cantwell Fada (long man) is famous for its intricate detail, historical relevance, and at over two metres in height, the tallest such effigy in Ireland and Britain. With legs crossed (possibly signifying that he had been on the Crusades), wearing a fine suit of chain mail, spurs and accompanied by sword and shield bearing the arms of the Cantwell family, it is believed that the figure represents Thomas de Cantwell who died in 1320. The effigy is beautifully carved, well preserved and definitely worth the trip to this wonderful church.

A 13th century sedilia near the altar is believed to have come from an earlier church at the site. In addition, the church has an adjoining original 3-storey fortified presbytery and bell tower which is definitely worth exploring.

Things you should NOT do or say in Ireland

The Irish are wonderful, laid back, easy going and very friendly people and visitors will often be completely unaware of any slips that offended or upset anyone. With that in mind though, here are a few things that you should avoid saying or doing when visiting or coming to live in Ireland:

  • North, South and everything in-between.

With Easter and memories of the Easter Rising events from 1916 fresh on everyone’s minds at the moment, I’ll start with “the troubles”, the North, Republic and the IRA. Do not make any insensitive comments or attempt to quiz the Irish about those events or the resulting situation. Some of them may answer your questions, but they much prefer not to talk about it and I want to ask you all on behalf of the Irish and English residing here to respect that. Things have been and are peaceful in Ireland and between the North and the Republic, the past is in the past and though the events are remembered, especially around Easter time, it brings up painful memories for many and is not something the Irish people like to discuss.

Which brings me to the next “don’t”:

  • Black and Tan and “Irish car bombs”

Do not go into a bar and order a “Black and Tan” or ask for an “Irish car bomb” Both drinks’ names evoke memories of troubled times and loss of lives and is found insensitive and decidedly unamusing by the Irish. A friend of mine here used to work as a barmaid in a pub and was asked for the former by a visitor trying to be funny. She calmly asked him if he’d like to drink it, or wear it. Enough said. Not all reactions will be as thoughtful as hers, but in general asking for either drink is best not recommended.

  • Claiming to be Irish

Unless you are a native and have lived in Ireland, or have Irish parents, don’t claim to be Irish or go around saying “I’m Irish”. Surprisingly a lot of people do and not surprisingly it annoys the genuine Irish a little. With that said, during your time in Ireland chances are that some Irish locals will at some point ask you about your ancestry and whether or not you have any Irish in you and would be happy to hear if you do.

  • Quizzing or joking about potatoes

This may sound like a strange no-no, but keep in mind that the potato played a big part in Ireland’s history, notably around the famine, when potato crops were lost to blight and many, many Irish people either starved to death, or left Ireland. Nowadays potatoes are the local staple carbohydrate and I recall someone once saying it’s hard to find a meal in Ireland with no potatoes in it! I found it not quite true, but they do manage to slip onto your plate with surprising frequency and they are delicious, so enjoy them with your meals, but don’t joke about them, or make too big a deal of them.

  • Leprechauns and Hollywood born cliche’s and sayings

Leprechauns are for tourist amusement only and tolerated by the Irish, with the exception of those who would sell you a souvenier of one. Outside of that small percentage of the population most Irish won’t appreciate jokes about them and would definitely not appreciate being called one. If you are interested in genuine Irish myths and legends, there are plenty of those to enquire about.

The only time you will hear “top of the morning to you” will be when an Irishman mocks the silly Hollywood born greeting. The Irish do have some fun sayings and expressions and I love how they play with words, but that phrase is not one used here and you will more than likely get an eyeroll if you try it out yourself, so best leave it.

  • “Do you know so and so…”

It’s a surprisingly common question and the answer is, with a population of over 6 million people, chances are slim to none that the Irish person you are talking to will know the other Irish person you know from that region or city. With that said, it’s something I find amusing and wonderful, whenever I introduce two Irish friends, they always start quizzing each other until they find someone they both know. The average Irish person do know a lot of people, but they don’t know everyone!

Lismore Castle, Co Waterford

If you take the N72 via Cappoquin to the lovely town of Lismore in Co Waterford, the sight pictured above is what welcomes visitors to the town of Lismore. Followed by an equally impressive view of the castle as you enter the village and cross the bridge into the town itself.

Lismore Castle (Irish: Caisleán an Leasa Mhóir) was built in 1185 by Prince John to guard the river crossing. The castle site was originally occupied by Lismore Abbey, an important monastery and seat of learning established in the early 7th century. It belonged to the Earls of Desmond, subsequently to the Cavendish family from 1753 and is currently the Irish home of the Duke of Devonshire. The Duke, who succeeded to the title in 2004, continues to live primarily on the family’s Chatsworth estate. His son and heir, Lord Burlington, who maintains an apartment in the castle, has been given management of it, and in 2005 converted the derelict west range into a contemporary art gallery, known as Lismore Castle Arts, which is open to the public.

The remainder of the interior is not open to the public, but is available for rental by groups of up to twenty-three visitors. The castle’s superb gardens however are open to the public. The upper garden is a 17th-century walled garden, while much of the informal lower garden was designed in the 19th century. More information and opening times can be found here: http://www.lismorecastlegardens.com

Kilkenny Castle

Kilkenny Castle is one of the best known and most visited castles in all of Ireland and rightfully so. This massive, beautifully restored castle dominates its section of the city center of Kilkenny. It has been opened to the public after extensive renovations and offers tours as well as access to its park, a haven of beauty, quiet and nature in the busy city center.

Kilkenny formed part of the lordship of Leinster, which was granted to Strongbow. Strongbow’s daughter and heiress, Isabel, married William Marshall in 1189. The Earl Marshall owned large estates in Ireland, England, Wales and France and appointed Geoffrey fitz Robert as seneschal of Leinster. So began a major phase of development in Kilkenny, including the construction of Kilkenny Castle, the first stone castle on the site, construction started in 1195 and was completed in 1213. This was a square-shaped castle with towers at each corner. Three of these original four towers survive to this day.

James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormonde, bought the castle in 1391 and established himself as ruler of the area. The powerful Butler family were to remain the owners of the castle for over 500 years, until in 1967, after a period of neglect, James Arthur Butler, 6th Marquess of Ormonde, sold Kilkenny Castle to Kilkenny Castle Restoration Committee for £50. The Kilkenny Castle Restoration Committee then handed the castle over to the State and it has since been refurbished and opened to visitors.

The castle is well worth a visit and has a lot to offer its visitors. For art lovers art of the National Art Gallery is on display in the castle and some truly beautiful paintings adorn the rooms of the castle’s walls. For nature lovers the extensive park offers hours of walking along the river or through the woods, where you can find an abundance of birds, waterfowl and squirrels. There is also a lovely play area in the park, for families with young kids.

And finally, for those interested in the paranormal, read more about the castle’s ghosts in Haunted Ireland – Kilkenny Castle